Author Archives: charisselpree

About charisselpree

The Media Made Me Crazy

Target vs. Total Market: The Paradox of Diverse Mainstream Content

In Lind (Ed.). Race/Gender/Class/Media: Considering Diversity Across Audiences, Content, and Producers (4th Edition). Routledge. Available at amazon.com/Race-Gender-Class-Media-Considering/dp/1138069795. It’s here! So excited to be included in such a great collection!! pic.twitter.com/e6XBr1Qt44 — Charisse L'Pree, PhD (@charisselpree) June 21, 2019

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Teaching Diversity through Satire Literacy at #AEJMC2019 in Toronto

Thanks to my co author Kiah Bennet and all of the students that joined me on this journey! Read more at charisselpree.me/category/research/satire Abstract Several studies reveal that satire is popular among young audiences, making it a potential didactic tool for … Continue reading

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2019 Bleier Center Commencement

Funny. The term co-viewing only emerges when it is no longer the norm. Continue reading

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Thank You Dean Branham

We lost an icon today. I lost a sister, a mentor, and a hero. I’m just grateful I got to share some of my happiest and proudest moments with the incomparable Lorraine Branham.

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Episode 1: Buddy Keanu

Originally posted on The Critical and the Curious:
In the first episode of the second season, we talk about the introduction of Keanu Reeves into the American public consciousness with Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (1989) and My Own Private…

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Critical and Curious: A Fast and Furious Podcast

I’m excited to announce my newest podcast with Bob Thompson! We explore the cultural impact of Fast and Furious through the lens of pop culture history, media theory, and representations of race, class, and gender. Continue reading

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